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Search Results 0 to 99 of about 607 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 2:30am PST
idea that we should wait for the science to get better, i think, is just, it's too late for that. so the cat is already out of the bag. the question is what do you do now that it's in the courtroom. well, we have dualing experts. we have judges sitting in a gate keeping role who have to decide whether or not the evidence should be admissible and whether it should be permitted in a case. my view is that the more evidence that we can provide to a scrr or to a judge -- jury or to a judge in their decision makings, some objective evidence, some evidence to bolster things like a diagnosis of schizophrenia or i.q., all the better. at the same time we need the critics in the courtroom explaining the shortcomings of the science so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. howev
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 10:00am EST
science and what it has meant for us on a whole host of issues. we will sort of a conversation with drew faust. \ let me spend a minute talking about that. drew, i am particularly enthusiastic to have him here. she is a woman leader. we have been focused on women's leadership. she has been at harvard since 2007. before that she was at the university of pennsylvania for 25 years. her academic career has focused on the civil war and the american south. she has been a prominent historian. as the president of harvard, she is focused on ensuring that there is education opportunity for all, for insuring that harvard bring means adverse on every level and at harvard remains the place that is attracting the best in the united states regardless of background as well in the world. she has spoken eloquently about the role that harvard plays not only in insuring educational leadership but our economic leadership as well. with that i like to invite drew up. [applause] >> thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. >> let's start on the topic of innovation and harvard role with in it. i think of ha
SFGTV2
Dec 1, 2012 8:00pm PST
sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. >> thank you all for coming, i would like to really briefly introduce bonnie angle with the breast cancer fund, she is going to do a presentation for you on prevention, ways to preventolin ks of chemicals in breast cancer and i'll let her talk about the rest, bonnie, thank you for coming. >> alright. thank you all so much for being here today. i'm very excited to be able to give this presentation to you, unfortunately, i was expecting to have a co-presenter who had a minor accident and visited the emergency room this morning instead of visiting us, so we have plenty of folks from the breast cancer fund and other groups on hand to answer questions, but we are missing our policy geru unfortunately, i don't know how much this audienc
SFGTV2
Dec 7, 2012 11:00am PST
-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california on a leave of absence from the science corporation, and i profit by what they
SFGTV2
Dec 5, 2012 10:00pm PST
breast cancer fund, we have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different
FOX News
Dec 2, 2012 10:00pm PST
he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [applause] >> we eat lots of beef in america and chicken. what about horse or zebra? why don't we eat those. aren't they kind of like cows? some of you shudder at the idea and it's illegal in some places like california and illinois, and conventional wisdom is it's not right to eat a zebra or water buffalo. so how are you repulsed and want do our taste test here? a few of you. is this wrong? well, that's bunk, as the chef at beaver creek ranch in texas. beaver creek is a resort where guests pay to hunt zebra, water buffalo, and this cute animal and then they ea kill and eat it after its been cooked by a chef. so, at the ranch, people come for this. they're not schemish. >> right. 14 different varieties of animals. pick out which animal you want to hunt for and take you out, we harvest the animal, bring it back, and i took it. >> and people say it tastes good? >> of course. >> and it's actually better for you because it's leaner? >> it is. and -- i've
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 2:00am PST
from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be com
WHUT
Dec 5, 2012 6:00pm EST
must be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jona
SFGTV
Dec 3, 2012 4:00pm PST
much more than just english and math. they are committed to science and social studies, arts, and other enrichment opportunities for all of our students. even in our mostpkñ?ñ? historically underserved schools, schools that previously wereÑññ?ñ? underachieving, the following examples illustrate in concrete terms the district -- to educating the entire child. framework has encouraged non-fiction reading especially in science and social studies. schools have purchased additional books with the funds available and material tolqñ?ñ? support student learning in all of the -- our school improvement grantrñ?ñ? leveraged resources have permitted us to make significant investments in technology and hardware that is being used across the curriculum. and in particular these investments further have>éñ?ñ? enhanced student interaction and engagement with science and social studies and even the arts curriculum. student funding has permitted the school to hire additional pe teachersióñ?ñ? while providing common planning relief time for classroom teachers to continue to collaborat
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
the evolution of language and technology and invention and art and science come which no other primate has done. very simple example of primates creating tools for using language, but it was indefinitely expandable hierarchical fashion. >> host: so you're thinking of the main functions of the neo cortex has been this high-level functions such as decision-making, inhibiting and proper actions. i mean, the neo cortex is a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high on both levels and uses the same algorithm. i've recognized the ages of objects for crossfires ofa and obvious functions that he got at the high-level, how to recognize and say she's pretty but that was funny. it exists at the highest level of the conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out was what happens to be one, a region of the neo cortex of the optic nerve stillson, generally the process is a very primitive pattern and images, like the ages of objects. so this low-level, simple patterns. what happens to it and it congenitally blind person? it actually gets taken over by the f
SFGTV
Dec 8, 2012 5:30pm PST
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by
FOX News
Dec 2, 2012 7:00pm PST
of ideas got embraced since the 1970s that were based on ray sufrpgs -- observations. the science is poor. we have been living with that ever since. in the process we have obesity epidemic diabetes increased four fold. the usda the food guy pyramid might have gotten it right why is obesity and diabetes increasing so quickly? >> you are a science journalist. you are an md you went to stanford residency at johns h hopkins yet the nutritionnal instruction you got wasn't good? >> i thought it was. i followed it myself and told everybody around me to try to follow it. about two or three years ago i was 40 pounds over weight and prediabetic exercising 3 hours a day and eating all of the right food supposedly. it had me questioning what it was i was believing and what it was i was preaching. >> increase carbohydrates, reduce fat from 40 to 30 percent. this was based on research that led to the lathes food pyramid that told us to eat lots of breads then vegetable fruit less meat and milk now michelle obama has her new version out called my play. it is comforting to know this is all based ons
ABC
Dec 4, 2012 11:35pm PST
: he assures us nothing can go wrong with this fish, altered by science to grow and get to market faster. >> this fish is identical in every measurable way. >> reporter: have we gone too far? >> i wouldn't want to eat this fish, unless it's gone through a proper approval process. >> reporter: critics say the fda scientists didn't do enough independent work and used company data to come to its safety conclusions. some of which tested only six fish. >> that kind of science wouldn't make it past a high school science fair. >> reporter: is this something i should be afraid of? >> you eat dna every time you swallow. you consume dna with every food you eat. >> reporter: altered dna? >> the gene comes from the chinook salmon. pacific salmon. that protein is identical to the same protein that's produced by the atlantic salmon. >> reporter: and nothing's going to happen to me or my children if they eat this fish? >> it will make you healthier. man has been altering the nature of animals since man walked upright and began domesticating animals. the beef that we consume, the pork that we con
SFGTV2
Dec 9, 2012 11:30pm PST
. john thorn writing in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick c
FOX
Dec 7, 2012 9:00am PST
some crude science experiments i guess you could say with this guy who calls himself the crazy russian hacker. in both of these videos he tells us -- this is a beer bottle bet you will never lose. >> most people will grab it and you can see it will fall. >> the crazy russian hacker has a solution. >> grab it like that and knock it like that. >> bang on the table slightly pulling up on the dollar bill until, poof -- >> the dollar is yours. >> he's teaching you how to hustle your friends out of cash. all right. we like mints and gum around here because we don't want anybody to have dragon breath but the crazy russian hacker is going to show us how to have dragon breath if you want. all you need is some cornstarch and a piece of paper. >> safety is number one priority. today we are going to have a fire extinguisher close by. >> let it out and blow on it. >> i don't recommend trying that at home. >> it's funny. he says don't try this at home yet shows us how to try it at home in his own kitchen and says it's just about the science of it yet told us none of the science behind this.
SFGTV2
Dec 9, 2012 12:30pm PST
overall exposures or -- yeah? >> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, y
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 9:35pm EST
in theield of science, engineering, and math, if you dig in a little bit more the numbers are stunning. i think champion is at 44% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 167% of your graduates. -- 16% of your graduates. as important as creating the kind of human talent that is needed in these key files that will drive innovation, then you know we're in trouble. i would correct one comment, there has been some of us chris on the democratic side and marco rubio and a senator from kansas we have put forward legislation long before the election that said let's look at this tall lent competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, those of us from the business world that have been talking about for decades. while we recognize we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science graduates, native born americans particularly but focus on losing the numbers in middle school on girls and minorities. we also have to continue to attract talent from around the world. one of the ways we can can and will is if we change our visa policies.
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 5:00am PST
frightening. >> tonight, frontline reports on the science and politics of the bitter "vaccine war." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you.and by the corporatir public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund. with grants from scott nathan and laura debonis, and the hagler family. >> what a cute little face. aww, here we come. it's a girl! >> yeah! >> she's beautiful. >> what's her name? >> rachel. >> she's beautiful. she doesn't want to cry. >> narrator: a new life begins. >> congratulations. >> thank you. >> narrator: out of her mother's womb, rachel murphy is now surrounded by a new world filled with countless germs. modern medicine will do what i
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 4:00am PST
first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence
SFGTV2
Dec 6, 2012 10:30am PST
science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and
SFGTV
Dec 5, 2012 9:30pm PST
call a hybrid between electrical engineering and computer science because it world has many different sectors and you want to be versatile. you don't want to -- well, some of us would prefer to be experts in one field. for example programming or making robots, but i think being versed in both sides of the spectrum tells you tremendously understanding programming, electronics, signal processing, networking, chip design -- i could go on and on, and i think this will give us more opportunities in the area rather than being skilled in one thing. now i'm a senior and i am graduating in the spring, fingers crossed and i couldn't have made a better choice. i think computer engineering was the best choice for me. like i said opportunities are not always readily available. we all get nervous about that. sometimes we need to take charge and take those opportunities so last summer i decided to take it a step further and i applied for probably about 200 different interning opportunities that i saw available on craigslist and on company websites, on government websites and i got lucky a few of the
SFGTV2
Dec 2, 2012 6:30am PST
sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2012 8:00am PST
into confirming that einstein was right. let me say a neat thing about science too. in a lot of fields, there'll be some sort of hero like einstein's our hero, here. we all love einstein. most of us do, yeah. so, einstein's our hero, and you tend to think, "well, if he's a hero, you don't wanna take shots at him." but in science, it's different. in science, say "hero-schmero." everybody is trying to crack that hero and find something wrong. everyone's attacking to see if they can find something wrong. and so science doesn't rest upon the reputation of some hero. science rests upon everyone else trying to find a crack in that theory. and all attempts, so far, have only gone on to substantiate this: time really is different when you're moving. but i'll tell you what? we're gonna talk more about these ideas next time and you know what i wanna do for you now? i wanna share with you a film that a friend of mine made way back in 1976. when i was teaching these ideas in the early '70s, i discovered this kind of treatment at the class board. that's one thing about teaching, you learn at
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 7:00pm EST
. carson had a way of taking science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and beloved authors. a subset she turned into a different direction. it is a disturbing book, a worrisome book that pointed out that we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. well, since it's meant 1962 any more thought would explain a little more for you about to rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in this house in springdale, pennsylvania near pittsburgh and allegheny river. she was born about the upstairs bedrooms of this has come with at the time did not have that addition on the right-hand side dish ec. it stopped at the chimney on the right. a simple, modest house, to downstairs into upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couplet outhouses up that come to a shed in the front where they occasionally kept the horse. it was a little bit in the??? words.? it wasn't completely in the country, but there is enough property around????????t carso
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00pm EST
west or the exiled them in some way internally. they encouraged more science and engineers. there were not going to create the environment where they would do more work. i am very disturbed and i want to say that one great state inner city is talking about incentives as against creating disincentives. you have to have people who are the imaginative and can look beyond the current crisis. that also has been part of the american middle class. >> i would like to see that -- more of an emphasis on science and math. in terms of k-8th grade. >> one of the great stories of physics, a young physicist who had learned, they started going back to questions of the uncertainty and they became more philosophical. this creates the area for areas of physics in the 1970's. you're not thinking about the deeper ideas and not setting up the framework for thinking operationally. >> do you want to pick up on any of that first? >> only for one thing. i fear that we have a burgeoning student loan problems in our country. it is the only form of consumer debt that has increased substantially. it is by defi
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2012 10:30pm EST
, american-born graduates in the fields of engineering, science, and math -- you dig, the numbers are fairly is stunning. -- fairly stunning. roughly 44% of graduates are in those skills. europe is at 24%. i say this respectfully, and i know we are on c-span. when the your pants -- the europeans are outpacing us, in these key fields that will drive innovation, then you know we are in trouble. i would correct one comment. there have been at some of us, chris coons and marco rubio, we have put forward legislation long before the election that said, let's look at this talent competition issue. let's put forward an approach that many of us, those of us that have been from the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we need to do more to prime the pump in terms of science and engineering or math graduates, native-born americans, particularly focusing on losing the numbers in middle school where girls and children of college had enormous challenges, that is something we will have to come back to. we also have to continue to attract talent from around
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 12:00am PST
by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 1:00am PST
technology, is it promoting the progress of science, is society better off because of that technology. it should not be based on the owner of that particular technology. >> reporter: regulators are holding a workshop next week to look at the behavior of these companies. the workshops are expected to shine a light on the controversial practice. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: another major international bank could soon pay up to settle allegations of price-fixing on a key interest rate. swiss bank u.b.s. is expected to settle charges of rigging "libor-rates" as soon as next week with regulators in the u.s. and britain. u.b.s. is not the first bank to settle charges for manipulating the rate that affects everything from credit cards, to state governments. last summer barclays paid almost half a billion dollars. >> tom: the major stock indices were weighed down as u.s. factories reported less business last month. after starting out the session with a small rally, the s&p 500 fell into the red by mid-day. it finished down 0.5%. trading volume was light to begin a new month. 6
CNN
Dec 9, 2012 10:00am EST
science history is it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. it's not one technology. it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, your entire genome profile in a few hours with a few hundred dollars which took billions of dollars and a decade. we have the ability to analyze those data through very statistical computations structures and artificial intelligence. >> so if i look at it. you show me a machine that now sequences dnas, the size of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than -- much more powerful than a machine five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days, a 24/7 run, one machine could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the u.s. in the year 2007. >> you also talk about how computing has become not only faster but much more sophisticat sophisticated. >> the most exciting is artificial intelligence. we're a third artificial intelligence where computers can think. they can think in a text real way where computers can help us make decisions based on vast amounts of information, game-changing. >> now i think we all unde
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 12:00am PST
will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late
CBS
Dec 6, 2012 6:00am EST
what science tastes like. >> chemistry in the kitchen, you bet. cool schools is coming up next. >>> howard here with your weather first. you'll need the heavy coats. down to the 20s in a few spots. it will be a sharply colder day, sunny with a few afternoon clouds here and there. lunch time temperature of 43. we'll only top out in the mid- 40s. i'll be back with a warmer weekend forecast in just a few minutes. >>> owward on the northbound side of 395, we've been telling you about an accident sitting on the shoulder north of duke street but before seminary road. more equipment has arrived on the scene. now original the two left lanes get through. expect delays as you come up from springfield. coming up in my next report, i'll also explain a situation going on in bethesda on the beltway at 6:18. back to you guys. >>> thursday morning cool schools time is here. we this morning are learning what science tastes like. the students in d.c. did their lab work on location. they went to a place where molecules and a master chef made for a tasty lesson. >> reporter: love the taste of hot
CNN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
have been major events and what's unusual about this period in science history is that it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. so it's not one technology, it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, the entire tumor profile in a few hours for a few hundred dollars what took billions of dollars and a decde aid, question have the -- >> if i look at just to understand that advance in computing. you showed me a machine that now sequences dna, it's the side of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than, much more powerful than a machine just five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days a 24/7 run, one machine, could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the united states in the year 2007. >> you also talked about how computing has become just faster, but much more sophisticated. >> we're now a third generation artificial intelligence where computers can think, they can actually think in a con tech churl way which allows us to make decisions based on vast amounts of information. game changing. >> i think we all understand, at least i t
FOX Business
Dec 9, 2012 9:30am EST
relionship between test scores and the amnt of time spept in the classroom. not in math or science or in anything. u.s. students spend more time in the class rom than kid in the chin affin land and japan. that helps one person and that ishe teacher unions where the recip yepts of the spending. if you want to help the kids privatize the system. before the late 1880s it was home schooled and private and more choice and better o come for all. >> john, is it worth it or the education of the kids is worth it? >> i don't think there is a correlation. i think johnathon is right here. i don't agree with privatization of all schools. 20 years we had a best education system . we still have great teachers and school accident, but as a system, we are failing and we are falling down behind other countries. you look at oecd inwe are falling back every year. it is not the amount much time, it is what they are getting while they are there. and we don't have the ability to merit base teacher or students and we have a problem of the infrastructure. >> christian, what about the economics of all of we
SFGTV2
Dec 6, 2012 4:00am PST
social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a usa today story and suicide and especially among veterans r
FOX
Dec 4, 2012 4:00am PST
role as well in terms of investing in some of those long- range basic science and basic research areas, which support all of these innovations as a platform, if you will. government investment in basic science for example, in biotechnology and genomics, has created a whole new growth industry where the u.s. is the world leader. those are examples where the government and industry together both can do things which help build our economic future. > the book holds some fascinating insights. "producing prosperity" it is called. willy shee, one of the authors. thank you so much. > > thank you bill. still ahead, rebuilding the housing market by fixing the foreclosure crisis. an update is coming up next. when we decided to update ourselves on the foreclosure process in america, we didn't have to search very far. chicago ranks 3rd in the nation compared to other cities. by state, it's california, michigan, texas, and georgia leading the way with the most completed foreclosures this year. joining us on set this morning is mary jones. she is the executive director agora community services.
ABC
Dec 4, 2012 4:30am PST
behind that >> i was going to say even though it is not darn -- not a 100% science -- [ talking over each other ] >> 100% science that has accuracy, a little less -- okay stop digging. [ talking over each other ] >> they didn't rate meteorologists i wonder who is dragging who down? [ laughing ] >> touche. >>> good morning. here's a look at a dry picture from sutro tower across san francisco towards the east bay hills. live doppler, scattered sprinkles northwest corner sonoma county where we are watching now, heavier rain lake and mendocino counties where going to stay for the better part of the morning commute. radar there the benefit of having live doppler 7 hd so far to the west already picking rain 90 miles offshore that going to take the better part of three hours to get to the coast. the sooner you get in northern sonoma the more likely you are going to be dry. upper 40s concord, live more, redwood city, los gatos, everybody else in the low to mid 50s. monterey bay, upper 40s to near 50. let's move on and talk about this forecast cycle, rain best in the north bay during the daylight
SFGTV
Dec 6, 2012 9:30am PST
addition we have a tourist sector going on, life sciences going on. everybody is innovating in the right places and doing it here in san francisco and there is a strong spirit and we will continue growth and jobs everybody. we want to help everybody out and support each other and that comes to what we do here in san francisco. today i am announcing a new initiative and clean tech sf initiative which we launching with all of you. there are three part it is of this. the first part is we're working with the california clean energy fund. i know jeff anderson is here today as part of them and he's going to be partners with us, and he's partners in every branch that we doing. the first thing we're doing as clean tech sf we will establish innovation zones in san francisco. what does that mean? we asked last time when we were here in san francisco and how can we help? perhaps we can help with the resources that the city doesn't use to the highest use. let's take our space. we have a lot of assets under utilized. how can we allow the demonstrations that you're having today have a real field
ABC
Dec 6, 2012 6:30pm EST
, astrazeneca may be able to help. >>> and now, science has finally tackled something and conquered it. something truly important. as millions of americans pace the aisles in search for the holiday gift that will bring a smile to family and friends. there is a new scientific study that says that there is a simple and inspired secret. and abc's sharyn alfonsi is here to make all of our lives easier. >> reporter: they are the moments parents pray for. >> oh my god! >> an ipod. >> reporter: those priceless reactions to the perfect gift. james groccia had his eye on the lego train set of his dreams. for two years, he saved up $100 to buy it. but by the time he had the money, the set was sold out. heartbroken, james wrote a letter to lego and then -- >> what is it? >> i wonder what it is. >> reporter: this arrived from lego. >> i finally have it! >> reporter: youtube is filmed with similar moments. >> we're leaving today to go to disneyland. >> are you joking? >> really dad? >> yes, we're going. >> reporter: daughter learning she's headed to disneyland. the mother learning she's about to be
FOX
Dec 5, 2012 9:30am PST
the time ininterweave phone book pages? >> they do it for science purposes. the only thing holding it are interweaved pages of two books. >> they have this car tied to the with a crane. you see the phone books. >> we have all four wheels off the ground. >> no way. no way. no way. >> way. >> noise is coming from it. >> it is impressive. the laws of friction and lifting the car and phone books. who needs superglue. >> there is only one problem. >> the only way this car drops to the ground is with a little help. >> drop it. they set the book on fire. >> there is notape on the er ta nothing binding the phone books together other than friction. >>> i think this is a really cute idea but i think if you hand the keys over to the dogs he is not going to come home. >> the keys? >> yes. to the car. these dogs were rescued by the spca in new zealand. they decided to team up with mini couper and teach dogs to drive. it looks like they are trying to teach these dogs how to drive. >> that dog is driving. >> i like how they all have different driving styles, too. one has the hand up here. this is fu
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
south florida as great a strain folks at entry point, there is science and progress of human trafficking. awareness part is important. they have to take the place when the internet for law enforcement because a lot of times they find themselves into prostitution and get treated as perpetrator rather than victims. if ecologists force them into a perpetrator but in fact we are the dems and they have to give him for certain judicial system to treat a women as victims and put them in a setting with a pull themselves away from drug addiction or whatever it's supposed appendices seem to keep them trapped. >> first i want to ask you a couple twitter questions that have come in what we've been talking here. one is who's the best meter in washington? >> robert griffing. [laughter] >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party? >> i think it was an election. it was a very close election when he looked than others and differences between. there is their free enterprise may maintain we need to improve on the way they connect those policies of the everyday life of every
SFGTV
Dec 5, 2012 8:30am PST
ei-opportunities a summer science program[me teachers that focus on a youth p.o.w. wow. ask the commissioner fewer to read the rest. >> commissioner fewer: whereas the parent advisory committee of the indian education program consists of parentsñ?ñ?ñ aides representatives, teachers administration and community members to -- on the distribution of the research provided for the program based on multiple data sources for a variety of services, and where pac empowers families, students and community6ó?n<ñq8 members and community to members that take an active and substantial role in thexét8k children's educationvx%f experience and whereas the program continues to collaborate with local÷ 2í3 ensure the delivery of quality services to support the:g(úbgd educational and cultural5]o+ and alaskan native studentsrvy'a including thewto9wa% american program san francisco and the urban trail san francisco system of care project, friendship house association indians-p<í='e, inc. of san francisco youth program. the2 s ák beço boardt indian education program title 7 on the occasion
CNN
Dec 10, 2012 1:00am PST
? >> reporter: at the houston museum of natural science, not concern, but a lot of curiosity. >> it's going so fast it actually gets through the atmosphere. that makes the glow. >> the museum's astronomer suspects it's a meteorite, a small piece of rock burning through space. if it meets the criteria. >> did it make a trail, did it actually move, did it change color, did it move from east to west? >> reporter: a lot of scientists searching for an explanation of what's called the fireball over texas. a lot of people who aren't scientists as well. >> i've heard so many different things about 2012, so it's kind of scary, because it's getting closer to that date. >> that was debra wrigley reporting. nasa has since cleared up the confusion. the flashing light, a meteor. >>> changing the look of our men and women in uniform and the military they might even take a page out of "harry potter." that's next. >>> almost half passed the hour. let's get a look at the headlines now. president obama and house speaker john boehner met face to face at the white house today to try and prevent t
FOX News
Dec 2, 2012 12:00am PST
. what you see happening right now, dana is the art of politics and verse us the science of good policy. we need to move away from campaign mode and stimulate economic growth and wealth expansion and not wealth distribution. when the president is focused on the wealth distribution politic which thomas jefferson and hamilton lincoln talked against we are headed on down the wrong path. more people are pushed to food stamps and more people pushed to poverty and unemployment situation is going to get worse. we have seen that recently with the weekly job claims numbers coming out. >> and one of the things that are part of the debate and since the carter administration is the need to reform entitlements and make social security is set on a path and available to children and grandchildren that are born today. >> it seems to me that cram -- congressman that entitlements are not part of the discussion but do you think it should be. >> it has to be. it is troubling when the president is ordering the expansion of government and increase of tax rates, but he's not talking about the true of our debt
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2012 8:00am PST
reactions. niceroony, that's junior high school knowledge, yeah, anyone takes a science course. what we wanna know is why all that energy, and i have a model for you to consider. and it has to do with mass. see on the table here, i have-- oh, it's imagination time. look, i have all the 92 elements in the periodic table that's found commonly in the earth's crust, almost all 92, are all arranged here. see the hydrogen here? see the hydrogen atom? what's this one here? helium. helium. what's this one? lithium. lithium. i got no names, but you can just kinda look at them, right? what's the next one? i keep running after you. i know what the last one is. you guys know what the last one is, 92? begins with u. uranium. uranium. excellent. okay. and so i have all the atoms all lined up here. can you see them? at least in your mind's eye. now what i'm gonna do is i'm gonna shake the atoms. i'm gonna take the hydrogen-- just the nucleus of the atom, okay? i take the hydrogen, i shake it back and forth, okay? now, it's harder to shake the helium. how come? because it has more mass. there's four nu
CNBC
Dec 5, 2012 12:00am EST
crossroads of science and the humanities, connecting creativity with technology, and combining leaps of imagination with feats of engineering to produce new devices that consumers hadn't even thought of. >> thank you for coming. we're gonna make some history together today. >> if you had to pick a day where it all came together, january 9, 2007, is not a bad one. jobs is in san francisco at the macworld conference in full pitchman mode as he unveils his latest product to the faithful. >> these are not three separate devices. this is one device. [cheers and applause] and we are calling it iphone. >> it is not only a remarkable achievement but a validation of everything that jobs believed in: if you made and controlled all of your own hardware and all of your own software, you could integrate all of your products and all of your content seamlessly into one digital hub. and no one but steve jobs had thought of it. >> this is something microsoft couldn't do 'cause it made software but not the hardware. it's something sony couldn't do 'cause it made a lot of devices, but it didn't really mak
SFGTV2
Dec 4, 2012 3:30pm PST
specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which would be coincidentally on february 1st to explain where we are. >> i personally would have no objection to that. and just to be clear, is it -- the decision under option 4 need to be made by february or all of the preconditions that we've talked about need to be sewed up? i mean, i realize there can be a point in january where it all looks like it's lining up and you and the agency decide, we're going forward with option 4, subject to some contingencies. and if those go bad, it has the negative impacts you talked about. but i think the concern from the community that we're hearing, and i know you hear this, is that we sort of set a false goal. so, i
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 1:00pm EST
wonderful co-authored it is a professor to of political science and political philosophy and art. many years ago when we were both at princeton university week co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to as co-operate several books on deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, you give it to legislate examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan presidency where tax reform was a huge and important issue and a hugely difficult issue to get done between the republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognizes that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch little too liberal democrat and reagan's staunch conservative republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise. part of the movers of that compromise. test for to the affordable care act. it ven more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign and helped not just pola
CBS
Dec 9, 2012 8:00am EST
this week." >> academic scientists may not like to admit it but science are money are intertwined, the threat of budget sequestration makes this clearer than ever if. u.s. falls over the fiscal cliff $2.5 million could be slurred from the budget. economics influences everything from the types of questions researchers ask to the quantity and quality of scientists who conduct research. in her book how economic shapes science georgia state university economist paula stephan argues --
FOX News
Dec 9, 2012 9:00pm PST
bomb shelters and worried about muss ills science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been pro clonged it was going on nobody could really see an end to it. there were all of the underlying risk of nuclear confrontations in the times. >> man wants it that required a few good men 7 to start with. >> there was 110 selected by the air force and navy. it whittled down to 32 after the interviews. 32 of us went to the clinic and i was the only guy to fly. oo i i had a high belly reuben which was a pigment in your blood. based on that they said well you are out. >> at the time your little boy was into dinosaurs and rockettes. you were not into dinosaurs. >> when i didn't get into the mercury program i was interested in rockettes before the guys could spell. >> project mercury began in 1958 with the goal to put a human in orbit and doing so before the soviets could. on the second count they failed. 3 and a half years after the sputnik shock on april 12th, 1961, the soviets out paced the u.s. once again when confidante became the first human being in space. >> they beat us into
FOX Business
Dec 2, 2012 9:00pm EST
it can all be fixed with good science. john: you have a book called "good calories, bad calories." but i know that a calorie is a calorie. >> the reason we get that is because we take in more energy than we expected. it becomes a unit of heat. protein, fat, the different types of carbohydrates, the glucose from fructose sugar, they all have different effects. whether or not you will store calories as fat order there will not the calories come up with a hormonal effects of the food. how much energy bring to us. john: but the u.s. department of health says a calorie is a lorie. >> it just hasn't been tested. one of the things we did when i started this organization. john: this being? >> the nutritionist study. we went back to world war ii to every scientist that attempted to answer that question. we found 82 studies that have attempted to answer that. they were all probably the same limitations and problems. in 2012, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence. a calorie is not a calorie, necessarily. john: one thing that absolutely must be true if you should eat less fat. yet you eat lo
CNBC
Dec 4, 2012 11:00pm EST
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. n you take a closer look.... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this.  is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, o
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 5:00pm EST
the theerling call debate, how do you reconcile what science has established what what you may think your faith teaches. when it comes to the age of the earth, there is no conflict. god created the heavens and the earth and scientific advances has given us insight. but i believe he has done it. and i have reconciled that. but other people have a deeper thought. in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe and that means teaching them science. but also parents have the right to teach them theology and reconcile those two things as they see fit. that's the point the president was making back in 2007. so that's what i was saying. >> accepting that context, household is the earth? >> -- how old is the fourth, four and a half billion years old. god created it out of nothing. and science has given us insight as to how and when he did it. and the more science learns the more i'm convinced that god is real. >> you have had a very fascinating faith journey. you were baptized catholic and mormon and later to the catholic church. >> maybe i'm a th
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2012 8:00pm EST
the theological debate, that's how do you reconcile with science definitively establishes what your what faith teaches? with the age of the earth, there's no conflict. in the beginning, god created the heavens and earth, and the scientific advances allowed us, given us insight into when and how he did it, but i believe god did it. that's how i reconcile that. that's consistent with the teachings of my church. other people have a deeper con flipght. i think in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever we believe, and that means teaching them science. they have to know science, but parents have the right to teach theology and reconcile the two things as they believe and see fit, and i think that's the point the president was making back in 2007 when he was asked the question. that's what i was saying. >> accepting that, how old is the earth? >> science says it's -- my faith teaches it's not inconsistent, but god great created the universe. god creates help and earth, and science gives us insight. the more science learned, the more i'm convinced that god is rea
CNN
Dec 5, 2012 12:00am PST
. bill nye, the science guy, takes on global warming scoffer mark morano. >> this will be the hottest two decades in recorded history. >> bill nye has a bunch of scary predictions. >> plus the b word. bipartisan. everybody is talking about hands across the aisle in washington. do they really want to sever them? >> they are going to create people to come together on this and get it done. >> none of us want to see taxes on middle class folks go up. >> the president is very determined to try to prevent us from going over the fiscal cliff. >> those three guys are here live. and the man who shut down the government under bill clinton. what newt gingrich thinks it will take to avoid that happening again. >>> plus one of my personal heroes, the fastest man in the history of planet earth. jamaican sprinter usain bolt revealing a talent you may not know he has. ♪ let's get together and feel all right ♪ >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. our big story tonight, you are so hot, america. i mean that literally. the temperature was a balmy 60 degrees this afternoon in new york
FOX News
Dec 3, 2012 1:00am PST
science. john: you have a book called "good calories, bad calories." but i know that a calorie is a calorie. >> the reason we get that is because we take in more energy than we expected. it becomes a unit of heat. protein, fat, the different types of carbohydrates, the glucose from fructose sugar, they all have different effects. whether or not you will store calories as fat order there will not the calories come up with a hormonal effects of the food. how much energy bring to us. john: but the u.s. department of health says a calorie is a calorie. >> it just hasn't been tested. one of the things we did when i started this organization. john: this being? >> the nutritionist study. we went back to world war ii to every scientist that attempted to answer that question. we found 82 studies that have attempted to answer that. they were all probably the same limitations and problems. in 2012, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence. a calorie is not a calorie, necessarily. john: one thing that absolutely must be true if you should eat less fat. yet you eat lots of fat. and you're a doctor.
Current
Dec 6, 2012 3:00am PST
and now he believes it is 4.5 billion years old which is what about the science shows it is. but he's doing this interesting thing where he's claiming to say the same thing that obama said about this. what obama was asked about was how do you explain to your daughters that you know, you're a christian. christianity said it took six days for the earth to be created. how do you explain that to your daughters. obama went on a theological question, we don't know how long six days is. i believe in the science obama has said millions of times, we should teach geology and evolution in science class and if you want to teach intelligent design and other theories, do it in religion class. and the important part with rubio is while he does seem to be tempering his first line now with mike allen yesterday after he got a lot of criticism for it he still believes fundamentally that you should teach creationism alongside evolution in classes. that's really where this comes from. his history when he was in florida as a state house speaker was a huge fight over evolution education in florida. he came
Current
Dec 5, 2012 6:00am PST
go to create -- it is like a science filmstrip. >> we were saying that for some reason, it is always such great timing politically because the republicans inevitably are acting like jerks at christmastime. here we go with the fiscal cliff and the debt and now they vote down the disabilities act right in front of bob dole in a real wheelchair. we're just like wow. >> absolutely. if anyone wants to make a music video using this song as the background alluding to all of that stuff you're talking about you know, i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: there you go. >> i can't speak for viacom's lawyers. >> stephanie: no. >> but i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: here's a fun fact. co-wrote ten of the album songs. who is so handsome and rowic and talented. >> thank you. >> don't be a jerk dates from 2009. the joe wilson thing was happening. it just seemed like rudeness and you know, the lack of manners and civil discourses breaking down. you know, my cowriter, andy and i came up with this phrase, how about a song don't be a jerk, it's christmas. it wasn't jerk as you know, steph
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 12:00am PST
alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warned lawmakers today not to add to the holiday pressures americans already feel, by letting the political stalemate drag on. but he also again insisted there would be no deal unless tax rates went up on the wealthy. >> the closer it gets to the brink, the more stressed we're going to be. >> woodruff: president obama made the short trip to northern virginia today to underline his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. at the home of what the white house called a typical middle class family, mr. obama said he's optimistic that agreement can be reached, but again drew a hard line for republicans in congress. >> everybody
ABC
Dec 7, 2012 2:35am EST
buy now that will make the kids go crazy on christmas morning. the science of picking the right toy. as a parent, i can tell you. look at that. so excited. nothing like seeing that unabashed joy on your child's face. this is all? >> christmas is about the kids and those moments right there. do we lose it as we get older? >> totally. >> here is your gift card. first, the major concerns among u.s. leaders about the civil war still raging in syria. reports say clashes between government forces and rebels are flaring around the capital of damascus. >> concerns are escalating abut possible use of chemical weapons, a step president obama warned syria not to take. abc's martha raddatz has more. >> reporter: hillary clinton overseas trying to find some diplomatic way to end this increasingly dangerous conflict. 20 months of fighting, 40,000 lives lost, and now the chilling possibility of an air attack with deadly nerve agents. >> there is no question that we remain very concerned that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: a senior u.s. official saying
FOX Business
Dec 4, 2012 8:00pm EST
someeople wonderused oveabout caffeine.es. the executive director of the center for science in the public terest said, "overdoing caffeine alone is actually pretty difficult to do. someone would have to make an effort to nsume 40 or so 200-mg caffeine tablets." or... about thisuch 5-hour energy... in a single day. we recomme... not more than two per day. yeah, when we fit came out with the product.. you know, i made sure of o thing. if my family wasn' going tose it... if it wasn't good enough for myamily if it wasn't safe for my f family... i'm not gonna put it out there. i take it almost every day. and twice when i play tennis. this is ouiter that we have to be safe... if we're not willing to dit ourselves... we're not askiking anybody elseo do it. we're not gonna se it. so, that's our approach toafety... that is a higher standard you can get. >> many companies are trying to take their money and run huge firms. ralph nader a big critic of many corporations and a move like this, ralph, what do you think? this is not a shock given what they are facing? >> this has been going on for a long
FOX Business
Dec 1, 2012 11:00pm EST
: math and science experts. it is known as the stem jobs act. science technology engineering and math. all the stuff that we need. it is unlikely that there will be passed in the democratic controlled senate. granting residency to young people brought into the country legally, some are calling this is achieved back. the gop version of the dream act. we have senator kay bailey hutchison with us. senator, welcome back. >> thank you for having me. gerri: tells how your legislation is different from the dream act? >> are legislation gives the legal status to the young people who are really in a conundrum. they have grown up here. >> we do give them a legal status and we don't pretend that i'm forgetting in line if they choose to go that citizenship route. >> you have to be under 14 years old when you came here, you have to be under 28-year-olds now. you can serve four years in the military areas or you can have six years in which to get some kind of job training or degree. a college degree or a vocational degree. something that gives you a skill. from that point, you will get a second vis
FOX Business
Dec 3, 2012 11:00pm EST
stuff is not easy, it is not science. but ken tried it make it fair, and doubly shore that those who needed the money g the money. ken is joining me now on the phone. ken, here is what worries me with money that governor cuomo is asking for, and governor christie of new jersey is figure for, they will likely get it, but there is no guaranteethat folks who need it will get it. >> you have to make sure that money doled out goes to the right people in a tamely fashion -- timely fashion the way that programs work, as you know, from covering 9/11 and bp. fast, without restricttion and used to ground the way it is supposed to be used. if there are administrative prove lem, then they have to be more efffficient. it is that simple. neil: but it seems to be for others who tried to do, what you dwell, that well is a long lag. for those affected, without a house, a few weeks is a long lag, in the scheme of things it ma not be. but in this case, it seems that fema was a dollar late and a day short, then some. my only fear, is that giving such entities more power and money may compound this. >> i
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